Gas Detector

Gas Detector

Answer: The Calibration should be conducted every month in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions. Or failing a bump test
Answer: A bump test should be conducted before each day's use in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions.
Answer: All sensors gradually degrade over time. Without regular calibrations, sensor readings during instrument use will not accurately display true gas concentrations. During the calibration process, the instrument self-adjusts so that the sensors retain their ability to correctly measure and accurately display gas concentration values. When a sensor has degraded beyond an acceptable level, it has reached its end of life and will no longer pass a calibration. 
Answer: Gas Detection instruments are potentially life-saving devices. The only way to verify proper sensor and alarm operation is to perform a bump test. Bump testing is the process of briefly exposing the installed sensors to an expected concentration of calibration gas that is greater than the low alarm set point. Also referred to as a "functional test", the bump test checks for sensor and alarm functionality but does not measure sensor accuracy and no adjustments are made to the instrument during a bump test. 
Answer: Zeroing sets each installed sensor to recognize the ambient air as clean air. If the ambient air is not truly clean air, any gasses that are present and relevant to the installed sensor type will be measured and displayed as zero. Readings will be inaccurate until the unit is correctly zeroed in truly fresh air or with a zero air cylinder. 
Answer: When the filter is showing signs of contamination replace immediately. Depending on application and environmental conditions this could be once every week to once every 3 months.
Answer: A 10.6eV lamp has a life expectancy of 1 year. An 11.7eV lamp has a much lower life of approximately 3 months. The life expectancy of these lamps is also dependant on the maintenance and application they are used in.